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Top Ten Things to Do in Japan

postJapan is one of the countries that have the best of both worlds. It’s advanced in terms of technology, and yet, it has been able to retain its greatest heritage – its culture. Indeed, Japan has done an amazing feat as it can manage to stay as one of the world’s leading economic powers while still being able to hold on to the roots of its past. And, as such, it has become one of the most interesting places to visit – a rich blend of history and technology.

1.) Watch the cherry blossoms fall

There’s no symbol of Japan more famous than the beautiful Cherry Blossoms. Indeed, the cherry blossom, with beauty so intense but so fleeting, is something that you have got to see if you ever visit Japan. They bloom during the months of April and May, and by the end of these months, they fall to the ground like a dreamy curtain of pink and white. There’s no other sight quite like it.

2.) Release your inner child

Japan

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Working Holiday in Japan – Visa Application Process

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If you are between the ages of 18 and 30 and are a citizen of one of the following countries, you qualify to apply for a Working Holiday in Japan visa:

* Australia
* New Zealand
* United Kingdom
* Canada
* France
* Denmark
* Germany
* Ireland
* Republic of Korea
* Taiwan
* Hong Kong

This is a special visa that is awarded to people who wish to spend some time vacationing in Japan while working in the process. In order to qualify, your intentions must be focused mainly on taking a vacation, with the option of working being a secondary perk.

If you state that your intention is mainly to work you will be required to apply for a working visa instead. There is also a separate visa for people who intend to go to school in Japan. The Working Holiday program is designed specifically to give vacationers who want to experience the full culture of Japan, the opportunity to work while they

Japan – Understanding the Land

Japan is a country that is comprised of over 3,000 islands. It is a modern day juxtaposition of things that seem to be a contradiction in everything we know. This, then, can be both one of its strengths and a weakness. The history and culture of Japan dates back to approximately 30,000BC but is one of the most technologically advanced cultures in the world today. But this isn’t to say that it doesn’t have a weakness or poverty issue.

Japan’s political affiliation is one that is known as a constitutional monarchy. While still ruled by an Emperor, his power is extremely limited. The actual power is held by Japan’s Prime Minister and, subsequently, the elected members of his Diet. The country’s sovereignty is vested within Japan’s people. Japan continues to maintain its close economic, military, and political ties with its main key ally, the United States. It has many other strong political ties such as being a standing member of the United Nations since 1956 has also been a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council for a total of 18 years.

A weakness of Japan has been a major pollution problem due to its

JAPAN, Unique in Every Way

Embarking on a journey to Japan, you will notice it is immediately different from other places in the world. As soon as you board the plane on Japan airlines, everyone bows to you. The stewardesses smile and are extremely gracious, bowing respectfully and pleasantly. Watching the video screen on landing, the airport personnel on the runway wave the plane to its parking spot and then bow to the pilots. Jumping on a bus, the attendant bows when the bus is finished loading. Japan is a highly developed, sophisticated society that holds fast to its past and culture, yet has embraced modern technology to the max.

One year after the big earthquake and tsunami that has caused a nuclear incident and tremendous destruction, it is surprising to see that life has continued to move forward better than you think for the triple whammy that Japan received. Other cities in Japan continue to be busy places of work, children happily attend school and life goes on. Had you not known what happened in Japan, you might not even realize what the Japanese have been through. Japan is a busy and thriving place.

Here are some of the

The Vicissitude of Japan’s Culture

Culture of different countries is different. One can easily notice the difference either by the visit, i.e. through experience or through learning their history and customs. Likewise, Japan culture also has its own specialties and features. Regular changes have been noticed in Japan’s culture, over the years. Modern Japan came into existence from the ancient traditional Japan and the birth of samurais. No doubt, influenced by culture of many neighboring countries, the modern culture of Japan has its own importance. This distinct culture of Japan is resulted from combination of different cultures. It manifests the creativity, independence and strength of humility of Japanese.

Japan culture is rich in the field of music, literature, art and architecture. The art of Japan is well renowned, from its traditional time to modern era. Japan’s animation is known for its artists all throughout the world. Video games, entertainment shows and music play a great contribution in cyber industry. Japan was famous for its music, samurai, geisha and many more. The other uniqueness is in their language, which plays a great role in the Japanese culture. Spoken mainly within the country and leant by many westerners, the language is written in

Dining Etiquette In Japan

Japan is a country of many traditions and etiquettes. Everything in Japan has its own way to be done and if you do something different, everyone will look at you wonderingly. Tourists coming to Japan are amazed and interested by the large variety of food available. However, there are some basic table manners that foreigners should know so that they don’t feel like a fish out of water in Japan.

In Japan, it is an important etiquette to say traditional phrases before and after a meal. People start a meal by saying “itadakimasu” (“I gratefully receive”) and after finishing eating they say “gochisosama (deshita)” (“Thank you for the meal”) with a bow. It is crucial for you to say these phrases, especially when you are invited for a meal or someone cooks for you.

Chopsticks are used widely in all Japanese homes and restaurants. It may be very difficult for foreigners to become familiar with using Japanese chopsticks. Besides knowing how to eat using chopsticks, foreigners have to know some rules of this kind of utensil. One of the most important rules is not to pass food with your chopsticks directly to somebody else’s chopsticks

5 Interesting Places In Japan To Visit On A Short Trip

So, you are heading to Japan for a visit. Excellent! Whether this is your first trip to Japan or you have been there before, it is likely that there is much you have not seen of this great and (to many Westerners) mysterious country.

A trip that will only last a day or two – such when you are just passing through Japan on your way to another destination – will probably not allow you enough time to see very much. In that case, do your best to make a couple of day trips near the place you are staying.

However, if you plan to be in Japan for at least 5-10 days and will have time on your hands, you are probably trying to figure out how to best spend your short time there. Fortunately, there are many great things to see in Japan. While your guidebook is no doubt packed with hundreds of things to see and do, you obviously will not be able to see even a fraction of them on such a short trip. Still, you will want to make the best of your time in Japan.

If you are going

Japan Travel: 3 Fun Things To Do Anywhere In Japan

If you are planning a trip to Japan, I’m sure most of you will probably visit a famous temple, visit an old castle and perhaps a famous museum or two. However, visiting these places alone will not give you a well rounded look into Japan and its culture. After visiting Japan every year for the past ten years, I’ve come up with a list of things you should check out. It shouldn’t cost much and you may not have to go out of your way to find them. These are common places, places that you would find in your area. The fun part is to compare the differences between the two.

Disclaimer: This article makes comparisons between Japan and the U.S, because I’m from the U.S. However, I think the general idea should apply to everyone from all countries.

1. Convenience stores

There are several different companies, including Circle K, Lawson, Sankus (pronounced sanks) and, of course, 7-Eleven. On the surface, they look like your ordinary convenience store in the U.S. but look at what is offered.

First off is the take-out food. In the U.S., you’ll find sandwiches, hot dogs, burgers and

Foreigners Wanting to Drive in Japan

Driving in Japan legally has recently afforded new challenges to foreigners from China, Brazil and the United States. Released in November 2002 and updated in February 2003, Traffic Act Article 107-2, has begun to create many problems for foreigners.

Until June 2002, Foreigners driving in Japan (who held a valid drivers license from their home country) could apply for an international driving permit (IDP) and drive in Japan permanently. Since that time however, IDPs are only valid for one year. If a foreigner stays in Japan for more than one year and decides to reapply for an IDP, they would have to leave Japan for at least 90 days in order for the IDP to be legal upon their return.

Those visiting Japan for a short time, of course IDPs are the way to go. They are quite cheap (around $10-20). Beware however, there are many sites on the internet that offer IDPs for several hundred dollars. These are scam sites and are to be avoided at all costs.

Quite a few countries have a much easier time in obtaining a valid Japanese drivers license when compared to the United States. Citizens from Australia, New

Learning More About Spending Time in Japan and Korea

Japan and Korea are nations representing two ancient cultures that have much in common – and much that is different. Relations between these two nations are complex because of its somewhat checkered history, but when if you do study abroad in South Korea, you’ll definitely want to visit Japan as well in order to understand it for yourself.

You may know that up until the end of the Second World War, Korea was essentially a Japanese territory as the result of political machinations on both sides as well as Japanese imperial ambitions (a taste Japan acquired primarily from Great Britain, France, Germany and the U.S.). What you may not know however is that the Koreans and the Japanese may share a common heritage that goes back several thousand years. Their earliest common ancestors – based on linguistic evidence – appear to be Altaic-speaking peoples who first emerged as a distinct ethnic group between ten and fifteen thousand years ago. Other languages within this group include Mongolian, Turkish and other languages still spoken in Siberia.

The two languages and cultures went their separate ways early on, however; the earliest Altaic-speakers appear to have encountered people speaking